KCB places cash strapped Mumias under receivership over Sh12.5bn loan

KCB places cash strapped Mumias under receivership over Sh12.5bn loan

September 25, 2019 0 By mykenyancareers
MUMIAS SUGAR COMPANY - KCB places cash strapped Mumias under receivership over Sh12.5bn loan
This is after the sugar miller defaulted to pay up the Sh12.56 billion loan it owes creditors, among them KCB, Ecobank Kenya and Commercial Bank of Africa/FILE

NAIROBI, Kenya, Sept 25 – Kenya Commercial Bank has placed Mumias Sugar under receivership, a move it says will protect its assets.

This is after the sugar miller defaulted to pay up the Sh12.56 billion loan it owes creditors, among them KCB, Ecobank Kenya and Commercial Bank of Africa.

KCB has also appointed PVR Rao of Tact Consultancy Services as the sugar company’s receiver manager.

In January, the three banks recalled the Sh2.6 billion loans they had disbursed to the insolvent firm, breaking ranks from other lenders, including French investment fund Proparco, who are owed Sh9 billion.

The company’s current liabilities exceeded its current assets by Sh21 billion for the year ending 30th June 2018, compared to Sh15.2 billion in 2017.

During the period, the company incurred a loss of Sh15.1billion, compared to Sh6.7 billion in 2017.

“The loss is attributable to acute cane shortage and loss of farmer loyalty which led to low production and underutilization of the factory operations as the plant shut down as from April 2017 leading into a loss at the end of the year,” Mumias Sugar Chairman Kennedy Mulwa said in the report.

The Factory resumed operations in mid-October 2017 after five months’ shutdown and operated until March 2018 before shutting down again because of inadequate cane supply.

The Miller has been betting on government support to restructure its liabilities. The government, which owns a 20 per cent stake in Mumias, has bailed out the company by at least Sh3.5 billion, which has since been consumed, with no improvement in its earnings or capital position.

In 2017, the miller shut down for a period of six months before the government bailed it out with Sh500 million.